Community Action

Community involvement is central to the activities of our membership!

shot clinicAnnual Flu Shot Clinic:  Annually, Dr. Ronald Frank and his staff set up a flu shot clinic at the FJCC.  In the Fall, flu shots are available to help protect the health of the Flemington area community members.

GETINVOLVED-GARDEN 1

The Giving Garden:  The FJCC Giving Garden, provides food for local needy families.  The garden was created as a Boy Scout Eagle Award project by Jake Nemeth.  He enrolled the assistance of various community leaders, solicited donations, built the garden, organized the planting and tending, and dispersed delicious, fresh produce to community members.  The garden lives on year after year with the assistance of many dedicated volunteers!  Thank you to all!

GET INVOLVED-COMM ORGJewish Relief Agency:  At least once a year, a large group of Hebrew School children and their families help pack food at the Jewish Relief Agency in Philadelphia.  According to their website, "JRA Philadelphia is the largest provider of food assistance to Jewish families in need in the Greater Philadelphia region and is the third largest direct-service food pantry in our area. Our monthly food distributions, which began in 2000, now assist over 3,000 low income households each month. What’s more, JRA has one of the largest corps of volunteers in the region – over 14,500 to date with an average of more than 850 people of all ages and backgrounds that volunteer each month. For many recipients, the work of JRA means the difference between eating regularly and going without."
FJCC blood drive

Blood Drive:  A few times a year, the FJCC sponsors a blood drive.  Our members and people from the greater Flemington community volunteer to give blood or platelets.  As the saying goes ... donate blood, save a life!

Although the drive is organized by FJCC volunteers, the entire blood retrieval process of handled by trained professionals from a local blood bank. Donating blood is a safe process. Each donor’s blood is collected through a new, sterile needle that is used once and then discarded. Although most people feel fine after donating blood, a small number of people may feel dizzy, have an upset stomach or experience a bruise where the needle was inserted. The blood is delivered to a blood component laboratory where it is processed into several components (e.g., red blood cells, plasma, platelets and/or cryoprecipitate). A single blood donation may help up to three different people.